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A recent study conducted during the peak of the COVID-19 pandemic sheds light on the factors influencing nurses’ decisions to continue or leave their jobs. 

The research, led by experts at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and published in the Online Journal of Issues in Nursing, emphasizes the critical role of coworker and employer support in determining nurses’ job satisfaction and retention.

The study, which surveyed 629 nurses across 36 states in the U.S., highlighted the impact of workplace dynamics and mental health on nurses’ intentions to stay in their roles. The findings underscored the importance of organizational support and mental well-being in enhancing nurses’ job satisfaction and reducing turnover rates.

The study’s findings underscored the direct link between workplace support and nurses’ job satisfaction amid the challenges of heightened stress and burnout among healthcare workers during the pandemic. It revealed that nurses who felt supported by their colleagues and organization were more likely to desire to remain in their positions than those who lacked adequate support. This highlights the need for healthcare leaders to prioritize creating supportive work environments to retain nursing professionals.

On the other hand, symptoms of depression were closely linked to nurses considering leaving their jobs within the following year. The researchers emphasized the need for organizations to prioritize mental health resources, such as employee assistance programs and therapy services, to support nurses facing burnout and other mental health challenges.

With the study’s compelling findings on the crucial role of workplace support and mental health initiatives, healthcare institutions have a clear path to improving nurses’ well-being, job satisfaction, and retention rates. The study’s authors strongly advocate for employers to invest in creating healthy work environments that foster staff support and implement policies to protect nurses from depression and burnout and cultivate a supportive work culture for their nursing staff.

The study, “Factors Associated with Working During the COVID-19 Pandemic and Intent to Stay at Current Nursing Position,” is available to American Nurses Association members and will be publicly available on September 30, 2024. DOI: 10.3912/OJIN.Vol29No02Man03.

The post Study Shows Mental Health, Lack of Workplace Support as Key Factors Driving Nurses Away from Jobs first appeared on Daily Nurse.

 

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